Drug Treatment
Drug Treatment
Drug Treatment

Substance Abuse Treatment & Recovery Approaches for Women

Drug Treatment

Substance Abuse Treatment & Recovery Approaches for Women

I recovery is a process of healing from the disease of addiction recovery is reclaiming lost dreams and lost potential I hello and welcome to another edition of the road to recovery I'm Ivette Torres today we'll be speaking about treatment approaches for women joining us in our panel today are dewana Baker associate administrator for women's services substance abuse and mental health services administration US Department of Health and Human Services becca Kroll executive director nexus Recovery Center Stephen butch pneus therapists program coordinator Emerton treatment services Imani Walker director Rebecca project for human rights welcome to the show today we're going to be talking about women's specific treatment efforts to want to why are women specific treatment efforts necessary because women which comprise more than 51 percent of the population need to have services that are specific gender specific to them they need services that speak to their specific issues women are different in terms of biological issues they are different in terms of being the primary caregivers of a family and they're different in terms of those issues relating to financial educational social issues of today so that the problems that women face the challenges becca that women face are very much gender specific and need to be looked at you know with a different light in terms of treatment I think that's right one of my first experiences in drug treatment I worked in a hospital program that was both men and women together in treatment and one of the things I saw there was first of all there would be 25 men and two or three women in the program the men did all the talking in the groups the women were quiet they were withdrawn and then on the first break they would be at the pay phone checking on their children in about two days 
later they'd leave a money is that what you experienced that is what I experienced and the pathway to addiction for mothers is unique over ninety percent of mothers whose self-medicate are self medicating to issues of trauma sexual violence and domestic violence and all of these traumas manifest themselves in terms of self-medication what do they self medicate with they self-medicate with a variety of drugs marijuana alcohol sometimes when that's not strong enough they move on to cocaine meth of courses really becoming an epidemic now for a lot of women and women who are mothers to children so I am a mother and recovery and I was self-medicating to serious depression and when marijuana no longer worked I'm moved on to crack cocaine has that been your experience in your treatment program stay in the treatment programs I've worked in frequently the women have an entire history that is almost cascading in terms of their several multiple interacting areas and it's almost like a vortex that sucks the whole process downward their difficulties with early pregnancy and childbirth which limits their financial capabilities which limits their residential capabilities which then feeds into a stronger need for a partner who then is in a position to do more controlling there's a lot stronger issues of domestic violence and all of these while we've talked about them one at a time if they were almost all of us talking at one moment that's the type of confusion that comes in when this person is in early recovery there's just so much that goes through their mind all at the same time and being able to prioritize and being able to select which is the most important when is it when am I supposed to move from one responsibility to another to another so it's it's a very complex a very difficult problem for them if I were a woman with a problem at what point should I begin to look for help diwana I think that that's more of a personal you know decision person has to decide that this is what they want to do you know and that they want to seek out help and a lot of times what they can do once they're ready is other their other friends who are probably seeking help go to their nearest public health facility within their state also talk with other persons who are in recovery as well but I think it has to start first with a personal decision that this is what they want to do and it will make their the road or the process to recovery much more easier it's a difficult road but it would make it easier because they have the internal I think the reality though is that a lot of women seek help when Child Protective Services has become involved with their families or the criminal justice system although I also see a lot of women being motivated by their pregnancies and by their children and I think that's a great window of opportunity the money was that your case yes that was certainly my case when it got to the point that I can no longer do the daily chores and responsibilities of a mother like making sure that dinner was on the table that the kids got their homework done those sorts of things is what made me first I seek help how were you in that pattern before you said this is going to stop tell us your story it was approximately six months about six months in I mean I knew somewhere around the 90-day mark that ok this is spiraling down this is no longer working but I didn't seek help right away because I thought you know I need to get it together I need to just rein it in and get it together in addiction is such a powerful disease that needless to say that didn't work it wasn't something I can do on my own said about six months for things you know I could no longer imagine that I could do it alone I finally keep your fingers and all the dikes exactly i finally sought help yeah but you know there's so much stigma attached and especially if you are a woman and a mother so I think in terms of when a woman should seek help disclosing isn't an easy thing to do even though you know you need help did you have a partner domestically were you in a relationship at the time actually no I was recently divorced and that was part of the depression an 11-year relationship to my children's father had just ended my mom had just died actually was feeling very much alone yeah and that's the case for many of the women are single mothers right Becca yes most of the women that we see it Nexus are single and don't even have involvement with the fathers of their children classically what happens is the crisis will emerge and there's usually a period of 48 72 hours in which the person's either going to make that commitment to go or they're going to continue to self-medicate the idea of a bottom that you have to hit a bottom before you get into recovery I think is true but there is no single bottom that everyone is going to hit it's at various points some crisis will bring up the consciousness if I need to do something but if it's not acted on within a very short period of time they'll accommodate down to whatever it is that's happened let's talk a little bit about not single women let's talk a little bit about women that are in a relationship and are having a problem with alcohol or drugs thus the partner play any role in that dynamic the partner plays a great role you know traditionally or I'm just by nature women are relational you know that is how we we know we relate you know we're very into communicating with other women or other persons and ninety percent of property even 99 percent of the women get into drugs because of relationships with their significant other their husband or whomever and so it does play a great impact on whether that person is supportive or not supportive you know whether that person uses that situation of the drugs being a factor of controlling you know the moment and how much the woman looks up to you know their partner so plays a significant amount and Becca what happens when the woman tries to stop and the man wants to keep going keep drinking keep drugging well I think it decreases her a chance of success if she's not ready to break away from that relationship because family support is a huge factor in recovery so if your partner is saying you're fine you don't have a problem or even don't leave me you need to be here with the children it's certainly harder beyond the the single mom challenges beyond the relationship challenges you know of a household where both are addicted why should women that are out there be very cautious when they begin to experience alcohol particularly alcohol or drug disorders in terms of their metabolism are they able to handle these substances as well as men absolutely not one of the more salient points is there's an in completely different body chemistry women's neuro chemistry is frequently serotonin based as opposed to the males which is dopamine so many of the substances of abuse interact with the estrogen cycle and so they're they're more vulnerable cases of development of cirrhosis are in half the time that you would see in the case of men which means that not only is the liver giving up but also the brain cells are being killed off at a more rapid rate they have the lower body weight they have our fat proportions than males and so all of that lends to higher toxicity issues for women and greater threats for long-term damage bday cancers and other types of nutritional deficiencies well when we come back I want to get back to the whole notion of what really happens to the children of these households as well because i think when when women are challenged by addictions it's not just you know themselves but the children that are involved as well we'll be right back when a woman first comes into substance abuse treatment she may not identify her alcohol and drug addiction as her most pressing problem she may identify some of her other very pressing needs such as a need for safe and affordable housing for education for services to help her become employable as her more pressing needs needs if her children may be very pressing so in order for a woman to be successful in substance abuse treatment she really needs a full constellation of services in addition to counseling a substance abuse education that we think of more traditionally as core treatment services when it comes to providing addiction treatment services genders can be a significant factor in fact we see with women they have a history typically more than men of being victims of abuse of being victims of trauma so it's critical to have that central to any planning process around addiction and treatment we also have found in the course of a five-year study that women who have a history of substance abuse mental illness as well as being a victim of trauma have better results when all three of those conditions are treated and when also those services are geared at meeting a woman at her point of need whether she needs an assessment for where she's at in the treatment process beyond the treatment process whether she needs a particular type of placement sam says  addressed this issue we have a publication called helping heal yourself and that can be obtained through contacting our Clearinghouse at 1 866 to help everyone with alcohol and drug addiction is in the same boat with treatment you can find solid ground for drug and alcohol information and treatment referral for you or someone you know call 1 866 to help there's life after substance use if you want one or know someone who does please call 1 866 to help my life before recovery I was a mom in a lot of pain I was recently divorced and grieving the loss of my mother I was unable to perform daily chores for my children it was difficult for me to make sure they got to school on time their homework was done mills were cooked I was spiraling down into a very deep deep dark place the little things that I appreciate now that I'm in recovery number one would be waking up with my six-year-old and being able to wake him and we have a morning ritual that we do being there for my daughter who's 20 years old down and being present in her life and her having the ability to talk to me about anything she needs to and also being there for my teenage boys their sport events I was not able to show up for anything when i was using let's talk a little bit more about the children in these relationship these dysfunctional relationship where both a woman and a man may have an alcohol or drug problem Imani well my children definitely felt the impact of my addiction my I have four children now fortunately one never saw his mom in addiction but the boys that I had they were very angry in the way that they acted out was behaviorally in school there were a lot of phone calls there were several suspensions getting into fights my daughter did just the opposite she excelled in school she hit out at school you know that was her time away from home away from the responsibility she was the oldest child so it was her way to I guess to have something positive and something affirming so she she did really well so it was important for for them all to get help as I came into recovery and they did get help and think as well yeah and that's a very critical aspect of it because I think otherwise these children that are in these dysfunctional relationships may actually adopt Becky those patterns themselves a lot of the women coming into treatment with their children at least initially minimize the impact on their children and would like to believe that they haven't seen as much as they have and haven't been as impacted but the kids typically are aware that their parents have used they have witnessed domestic violence and in the course of treatment there's typically more willingness on the parents part to acknowledge that and to embrace the help we can offer for the children the kids typically settle settle down so quickly in treatment with the routine and the patterns seeing their mom every day knowing that she really is going to pick them up at the end of each day all that uncertainty is gone and they so quickly blossom and the mothers see that they recognize that and that's important that's an important factor in their staying and treatment also as far as the barriers that some women may see to seeking addiction treatment with the fear of having the authorities take their children away be one of the environment absolutely in the family recovery court where we I provide services for the family recovery court it is that absolute fear that my children have been placed in foster care and recovery is one of the requirements and it's one of many that they must fulfill in the a court system in order to be reunified with their children and that is a tremendously driving force while they may be very dysfunctional that does not mean that they don't love their children and it doesn't mean that they are incapable but frequently the children are the unintended and meshed partner in this downward spiral that the addiction takes every one every one of the 
family on sometimes also you'll see the role reversals where the child actually becomes the caregiver the peacemaker the the healer for the the parental strife is going on the roles need to be fulfilled if the parents are too impaired the children will attempt to you'll see them take their parents face between their hands and say mom I love you or dad it's okay and they will attempt even at the age of men three and four years old to fulfill those roles because they realize how necessary they are and that's why we need to have the children go into some type of help as well right Donna the importance of family treatment you know looking entirely at the family you cannot just treat the mother without the child or the children and or vice versa you have to look at the whole structure and also today we cannot look at what traditionally we've known is what a family structure is a mother father and children a family structure could be the grandmother and the and the children or it can be the child and universes and it could be the child who's the family structure and bringing everyone together so we need to look at no the importance of family treatment and I think that is critical we've spoken of the challenges when the mother has an addiction when both parents have an addiction let's dive into the the whole issue of domestic violence it is complicated enough when domestic violence doesn't exist in the home or doesn't happen but what happens when both the woman is receiving the wrath of the alcoholic or drug addicted male partner and and the children are getting it as well Steve eighty percent of old women who died violently know the perpetrator on a first name basis and that's only the tip of the iceberg because for every horrific event such as that you do have the constant intimidation you've got the control that comes into a complete environment of fear of intimidation that goes down from the spouse or the partner to the children and so there's a complete hierarchy and if the children are not adequately protected then not only is their anger and resentment towards the perpetrator but there's also for the parent who failed to adequately protect so it goes to several levels and many times they don't feel supported on any adequate level I get concerned that the children are becoming the next generation when they witness this kind of abuse and then you know without intervention we're just preparing them to step into their parents roles there's been a five year study that santhu have participated in and looking at women with co-occurring issues in trauma as well as looking at their children and that is one of the significant findings is how the children are repeaters of what they see you know as as they were growing up and so the study has been proven to be very beneficial and it had the fruits of many other studies that are now ongoing you know within Sam's but that's oh it's not completed yet it's not completely son going on going but what are the things that we do know about core occurring and I'm so glad that you mentioned that because as we're talking about the trauma on the children on the on the spouse who may or may not be addicted there are also complicating factors related to depression related to bipolar disorder related to many other mental illnesses that may exist talk to us a little bit about that Donna when we look at the issues when we looked at the study then how it all came about is because of the fact that we know that when women present with one illness let's just say substance abuse we know for a fact that majority of them had experienced substance I'm sorry child abuse issues neglect etc and they're coming to the healthcare providers with depression or low self esteem with issues of anger with issues of trauma things that they have not even voiced to anyone that is why it is so important so in a critical that is health care providers that we form this relationship with women and meet them where they are they're important issues maybe transportation or childcare it is important that we meet them there and but more importantly we need to be skilled enough to know that and knowledgeable enough to know that these are some other issues that our women are faced with the corcoran mental illnesses the the issues of depression and abuse and so as we develop a plan in a family context a providing treatment for the family these are some of the major issues that we have to look at and not just look at the specific issue that the patient presented themselves in isolation because that would you have found in terms of the children that present for for treatment with your mother's the women tend to primarily have depression and anxiety as they're co-occurring disorders and you certainly see the effects of trauma the children really as Imani said it can take different forms with the children you see the sort of hero children who really do well and are trying to hold the family together and we also see the kids who are acting out in a big way well when we come back I want to really talk about the assessment part of when the woman has the hot moment or the parent has the aha moment and they say we need to go in and we need to get treatment and let's talk a little bit about what that assessment is all about does it catch everyone who has perhaps a co-occurring disorder and and how does it happen and what are the best frameworks of treatment for for women when they have an alcohol or drug problem we'll be right back I'm a sophomore in college this year man if you hadn't only when I was a sophomore in high school nobody could tell me anything I gave all my teachers of that time they all give up on me said my English teacher eight years teaching high school English 10 years in recovery for alcohol addiction to be or not to be I got help that's it right there when you get help who knows just so you'll help along the way for drug and alcohol information and treatment referral for you or someone you know call one eight hundred 662 help nice job hey man how's it going to a person recovering from substances what you say comes through loud and clear d yeah if you knew someone in recovery give them support and if you know someone who needs help give them this number 1 866 to 
help how much children is an evidence-based program located in baltimore maryland it takes women out of jail in prison when they're pregnant and brings them to a very special place where we help them with their issues about ddiction and trauma and help them maybe for the first time in their lives to make a healthy attachment with their baby that's coming the women are referred through the criminal justice system they are either in jail or in a detention center and they are pregnant and most of them have drug-related crimes we teach them how to form a healthy bond with their infant say most children has helped me because it has allowed me a chance to connect with my child and it helps me with my trauma and my addiction issues as well well this program is different from other programs because this program dealt with my trauma and my addiction which goes together the other programs that I've been an F only dealt with just my addiction part which is one aspect of my addiction and so I feel that this program deals with everything in my life that all go together we look for these women to give them the face and to give them a name and for people to understand that the women who are in jail or real people that have had things happen to them that have gotten them into jail in prison and that when you give them a chance and you give them therapy and the therapy is focused on both trauma and substance abuse and the fact that they have an opportunity to change what happens to the next generation that they really bring themselves around and don't find that they need substances we were talking about issues related to co-occurring and that brought to mind the whole notion of when the person or the woman has that aha moment I need treatment I need to seek it what are the best possible alternatives for that person and perhaps we should start with money and hear from her in terms of how you were able to carry out that desire to go and get treatment it was quite a challenge to access appropriate treatment once I realized that I had a problem didn't really know what to do so I remember I literally dialed information for 11 an axe for drug hotline and it was through going to 12-step meetings that I found out there was treatment available for a mom like me we didn't have very much money so I landed in several treatment programs that weren't appropriate for a mother with children who needed services and supports in those treatments days were not successful you spoke of the assessment process I remember telling them that I had children I had issues with housing I need marketable skills I was recently divorced I had I needed economic stability for my family and there weren't gender specific groups I mean it really was almost a two year struggle of going in and out of treatment programs that weren't appropriate for mom before I finally access appropriate treatment that did a very thorough assessment and got me into parenting classes and all sorts of classes that were appropriate for mom what happened when you actually went in to the one program that really had all the components that you were looking for wow what happened was very profound I was a mother who was addicted to crack cocaine and literally cannot stop I used the night before I went in and I wouldn't in that first day and it was a woman's program there were all women there and that was the first time I'd ever been in a woman's program they were women there with long lists of clean time had been in and out of 28 to 90 day treatment programs so for a woman to say that she had six months clean 12 months 15 months those were clean times that I thought were unattainable for me Hooper have had the same problem that you had that may have been also using crack that's exactly what I'm getting to that very first day women told stories of being homeless in their car and going from that to a shelter and then to transitional housing and then getting permanent housing we had community meaning and people will tell their news women talked about their children acting out in school and now he's doing so much better you got an individual therapist so my experience with accessing appropriate treatment that very first day made all the difference in the world I have never smoked crack cocaine since that very first day and I literally couldn't stop so it made all the difference in the world in terms of co-occurring however did they ask you whether you had you know that they evaluate you for that as well I was assessed as clinically depressed and and it was a very thorough assessment I met with a psychiatrist and we you know tried to get to the bottom of whether it was situation on me certainly if you're smoking crack you're depressed it brings on depression and it was clear that you know I did experience domestic violence in my relationship with the children's father it was an 11 year relationship that that ended my mom had died we were very close and I was thrown into being a single parent with the responsibility of taking care of her children and it was clear that that I was self-medicating and I was depressed so there was a additional co-occurring mental health disorder do I know what would you say to programs and to individuals who may need to seek help do they should they ask for an  assessment themselves if when a woman walks into a treatment program is not offered to her I have the pleasure of knowing a money and she had shared our story her story with us before one of the things they really impressed me about her was the fact that she did a lot of homework herself you know and she was able to really in and as his challenge to healthcare provider but I think as a health care provider and having worked as one you know worked in the trenches that is our responsibility to be knowledgeable to be knowledgeable about all the issues that our clients are coming in that are faced with and it helps when you have a person such as Imani who is knowledgeable and taking responsibility but by all means yes you must do an assessment there's so many other things HIV and AIDS sexually transmitted diseases children who have been abused you know my sexually you know by the incest right by partners you know it is having linkages with transportation having linkages with other healthcare providers for different things I think it is so important as providers that we first and foremost be knowledgeable and that we reach out and establish these linkages for our clients because they do definitely need these services does that sound familiar Steve I think part of the reason that recovery tends to be not a straight line event but kind of an event with a learning curve to it is partially the responsibility of our inability to deliver the appropriate treatment service at the appropriate time I do think that part of what you see with this back and forth up and down maybe 3-4 times you're attempting recovery and unsuccessful is partly because we don't have the full continuum of services that we need and it's extremely population sensitive I know once you get west of the Mississippi River and your population density drops so drastically you find that you'll have towns of you know 3,000 4,000 people and and being able to support say an intensive outpatient program is out of the question there's just not enough individuals who need that level of services and then your cobbling together they don't have a computer so they can go into the new e therapy yes and it's you know they do teletherapy for instance with the psychiatrist out in Montana in which the therapist the local therapist and the client go into a move they do a teleconference with a psychiatrist who may be in Billings they may be out in st. Helena for example so these are the kinds of things that we as providers must continue to develop to meet the the needs of the clients it's a point that we keep in mind a holistic approach we're not just treating a fragmented person with one issue we're treating that person with a multitude of issues that come in so therefore we need to be comprehensive in our approach in our screening and looking at that person yes they may have it may have been their depression or may have been the fact that they no longer want to see their children abused that brought them in but that is not the total reason why they need the services that we need to provide and the one on what kind of services does Samsa get involved with in terms of generating and supporting the whole concept of science the services meaning how do we improve continue to improve the services to women what or what or what do we have in our toolbox programs like the pregnant and postpartum women and the residential woman and treatment programs which are really historical programs that have continued since 1992 when Congress in the era of the crack cocaine era you know establish these programs the need for having women specific gender specific services and these are the programs of today where Congress has set aside congressional earmarks for these programs and these programs components would include then right know exactly what Imani was talking about the thorough assessments are the residential for the children and the mother so they can both be together right the whole issue of the intervention with the children's separate for the mother that I think Becca was also referring to exactly four actually program for pregnant women was funded by csat in 1993 very fun sure talking about her how we got stuck we got started well talk to us a little bit about that program well it enabled us to encourage pregnant women to come into treatment which i think is huge for several reasons it's time and motivation for the women so they're more likely to be successful but it's also a great opportunity to reduce spiegel alcohol syndrome fetal alcohol effects and so on with the children we link the women to prenatal care and that makes a huge difference in Mars outcome we provide good nutrition for them help them remain drug-free envision those those three things alone improve the birth outcomes dramatically the prenatal care nutrition in a drug free period and you also get into some of their concerns in terms of what happens after they leave right the program do they get training for work related skills do they get housing do they get other assisted that's what Marian programs comprehensive also makes them difficult in a sense to pull together because they are so comprehensive drug treatment is really a misnomer you know the drug portion is small it's part of right but all these other services as well when we come back I want to come back to this and i also want to get into the whole dynamics of the family courts in the drug courts you know because i think that more people need to know that not to fear that whole system but to really embrace it because it is one of our best options for families experiencing addiction issues we'll be right back how was school today how was school today session glory you have a good session why I got every game with me I got to get for the game talk with the kids in your life about drugs and alcohol and if they're in treatment or recovery support them even if you have to practice I am so proud of you for drug and alcohol information and treatment referral call 1 866 to help feeling overwhelmed by current events don't turn to drugs and alcohol hey how was your run great substance abuse is not the way to manage life if you or someone you know needs information or treatment referral call one eight hundred 662 help for more information on national alcohol and drug addiction recovery month events in your town and how you can get involved visit the recovery month website recoverymonth.gov well I think we have to recognize that for the majority of women in particular who are now in the child welfare system with their own children were either in the system themselves or perhaps should have been and should have been protected there's a tremendous amount of child abuse and sexual abuse that's gone on for women who now have children of their own I can only imagine the guilt and the shame and the fear that they have to experience that day when a social worker says I'm placing your children in foster care that is really the moment in which we can say there's hope here for you there's recovery here for you and how do we make that happen in a timely way so the parent to get that hope and they get that ability to be in recovery and learn how to parent their children when you look at treatment outcome research about women and children in particular that women that do the best are often the women that have all of their children with them those that sometimes don't do so well are those that don't have safe places for their children to live they're worried about where their kids are they may not yet be ready to parent but they have this need to take care of their kids I don't want her to have to have drugs and alcohol as a part of her life as long as I'm patient and I don't pick up me and her going to be just fine I think we definitely are improving services to women are there enough comprehensive services around the country I think we know that there's not but we know that there are many many dedicated providers that are looking at that individual woman and understanding what is part of the package of the services that they need and making those linkages in the community to either provide those services themselves or providing them through coordination and through a collaborative effort to the other comprehensive services that women and children need I'm very encouraged by the kinds of models that are being developed by the effort that is underway around the country to to really embrace that we have commonality and how we see families and we're not trying to separate families so much anymore that we're just about the recovery for the parent or we're just about the safety of the child but really seeing whole families and how whole families have to mend and how whole families can recover they've talked to us about the drug court programs and who are the types of women that that are targeted for that system and how does it work the family drug court system generally will have individuals who are parents of young children predominantly most of the participants are in their late 20s to the mid 30s although we've had some leaders much as in their 50s generally something has happened within the family that has brought on the attention of Child Protective Services it may be domestic violence it may be abuse it may be new to elect it may be a first-time notification or it may be kind of that ongoing tracking a small incident here from school small incident there from one of the neighbors complaints another small incident because of a run in May perhaps the children have had with the police but when they begin to look at it they begin to see this emerging pattern and through training they know to make the referral assessment in the assessment the particularly the mothers are immensely humiliated that someone is questioning their desire to be an adequate mother it is tremendously humiliating for them and is one of the things when we do the initial go around an introduction to the group that I want to make sure that each person has a chance to really spend some time to talk about how they got there what happened and then each member of the group will take some time to explain how they got there so that there is this sense of when I shared yes and I am NOT the biggest rat that's ever lived may individuals because it is a lengthy process we're talking nine months it gives them a chance initially to come in with the enthusiasm of I'm going to get involved in this and I'm going to prove to all of you that this was a terrible mistake and that I am a really good mother and then they make that transition into the mid phase in which they've been there maybe four months or five months and now they're beginning to think this is never going to end I'm exhausted because there are a lot of requirements they don't stop becoming a parent even when the child is out of the home there's visitation there's birthdays and holidays it's still need to be recognized and all of that still occurs as well as the treatment the job placement to parenting classes so it's a it's a full schedule finally they get to the end phase and then the anxiety begins to set in in terms of that complete reintegration out in the community and this is where the the 12-step programs and the community support systems become so important we have an alumni group that continues to meet and it's open-ended so that for individuals who have still want to keep a foot in the in the treatment arena its staff monitored but not staff directed but it's a it's a it's a comprehensive process it's a difficult process but it's certainly navigable we've had graduations from the drug court and it's it's going well talk to us about the programs that are not necessarily through the court system but that actually tap women that are that may not have children for example what are those programs like that Nexus we do have a program for adult women unaccompanied by children many of them have children but may have a safe place for them to be or may not have cared for them for a long time it's still important that the programming be gender-specific we're not talking child care prenatal care in that program but it's still very important that women be with other women it's like Imani described the difference between being in the program where you but it really relate to what was being said and walking in and seeing other women hearing them talk about the same issues you've experienced and that hopefulness that comes from seeing someone like you who has been there and says the message that you can get better the Rebecca project for human rights we are an advocacy organization for low-income women with substance abuse issues and one of the things that we do is wiener network with treatment from providers across the country so I just wanted to highlight a couple of treatment programs that deal with women and children but they do have a program for women without children as well in like Becca said her program is mixes in dallas texas there's a amethyst which is in columbus ohio there's a the womens treatment center in chicago illinois there's the chrysalis house in kentucky lexington kentucky so they are those are some of the ones that I know are great and we have contact with those programs but there are many across the country and what is 
the success rate are women tailored programs or programs tailored for women more successful in terms of the outcomes they are definitely more successful the national average for success is approximately sixty two percent compared to I believe its twenty to thirty percent for single adult treatment and I just want to make one correction even though I said there are many only five percent of all treatment is geared for women and families so there's there's a 
lack of them but I just wanted the audience to know that that there are programs that they can access let's talk a little bit you mentioned about funding I know that Samsa has the Block Grant and that people can actually try and get money from the state to set up these programs but what other types of resources are available for individual programs that may have a an addiction treatment component but not necessarily you know targeted at women and want to set one up Becca I'm not sure I know the answer our programs have been largely state and federally funded I would love to see the drug courts embrace family treatment in our area at least they will send women to treatment but and men adults but no recognition of family treatment we do a lot of fundraising in the community to support our government grants and it is easier to fundraise when you're touching the lives of women and children so that helps but there's also a limit to how much money can be raised in the community Robert Wood Johnson is also a very good foundation for seed money to again get programs up and started they do a tremendous job within the community and what I would say from the federal perspective that you know Sansa's mission in terms of building resiliency and color and recovery we are committed through on Block Grant to have the set aside in the substance abuse prevention and treatment block grant for pregnant women and given priority mission you know to women as well as said earlier about the the ppw the pregnant postpartum women and the residential women and children's programs as well as a host of other programs the fetal alcohol syndrome development center for excellence program my partnerships with the administration for children and families you know speaking on the issues of the drug courts you know all of that stemming from the adoption and say families afton sense that has really done a lot of partnership on center for substance abuse treatment in that area so we're very clean and those issues and want to build resilience and facilitate recovery for our women and children as well and Steve there's also the National Association of drug court and family drug courts so people can also seek help there they can and while it there is some referral aspects to it frequently if they are not the appropriate provider they do network as the money said that the the ability to network among providers is extremely important and we we have to be cost sensitive to the resources that we have and so individuals within the field know who has the beds open who's really full at this point whether this individual though I may do say an intensive outpatient program may recognize this individual may only need an outpatient level of care and so do I make the referral to the appropriate treatment provider thus keeping the higher level of care bed or treatment slot available for the women out there that may have been in recovery that are in recovery right now and functioning well in their community and giving back to their children and their families and giving back to that community should they play a role in breaking down the stigma for other women who have who may have a substance use disorder challenge in their home I believe they absolutely should and can play a role I direct a project called sacred authority and we are an alumni network and we are the leadership corridor Rebecca project and we are all mothers and some fathers who are in recovery and we do the advocacy work for the Rebecca project we are policy organization and we fight for more funding for these types of treatment programs fair and just laws and legislation when it comes to tana for the the Astra law that she mentioned so yeah I mean I think that we are best able to give voice to the experiences and what it is that parents and women and recovery need so I know that in the work that I do in terms of organizing mothers who are single parents and in recovery our plate is not full it is overflowing so there there there are different ways that you can help it may not be to do what I do in terms of briefings and meetings with you know congressional staffers but there but there's a role that everyone can play if nothing else speaking out and getting rid of the stigma absolutely and they can do that through national alcohol and drug addiction recovery month every September we encourage everyone to get involved and plan an event or do whatever they can to really break down that stigma I want to thank you for being here it's been a great show for a copy of this program or other programs in the road to recovery series on DVD or VHS call sam says national clearinghouse for alcohol and drug information at one 870 296 686 or order online at recoverymonth.gov and click multimedia national alcohol and drug addiction recovery month observed each September provides an opportunity for every community to highlight the effectiveness of treatment for alcohol and drug use disorders and to help individuals and families affected by addiction find help the free recovery month kit can help your organization carry out an effective strategy to raise awareness and promote the benefits of addiction treatment in your community the kit offers ideas for planning and helpful tools for implementing an outreach campaign or event that matches your goals and resources to receive the recovery month kit or other free publications and materials related to addiction treatment visit recoverymonth.gov or call one eight hundred 662 help it's important that everyone become involved because addiction is our nation's number one health problem and treatment is our best tool to address it you you you you See more here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tK87pHEkIno

drug rehabilitation statistics

Drug Treatment
Substance Abuse Treatment & Recovery Approaches for WomenI recovery is a process of healing from the disease of addiction recovery is reclaiming lost dreams and lost potential I hello and welcome to another edition of the road to recovery I'm Ivette Torres today we'll be speaking about treatment approaches for women joining us in our panel today are dewana Baker associate administrator for women's services ...